Category Archive: archaeology

Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia: Lots and Lots (and Lots) of Rocks

I don’t exactly know how to describe how amazing my experience at Joggins Fossil Cliffs was. So, I will just say that hands down, I saw some of the coolest shit I’ve ever… Continue reading

Museum of the Cherokee Indian

I was so intrigued by the Native Peoples exhibit at the McClung Museum that I incorporated a stop at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian on my journey to the coast. Because my… Continue reading

McClung Museum, Knoxville, Tennessee

When I was in the Big South Fork Recreation Area in Tennessee there were some bad storms forecasted so I had looked up some alternative activities and found the McClung Museum, a free… Continue reading

Mission San Luis de Apalachee

The Mission San Luis de Apalachee was first built by the Spanish in 1633, housing both Franciscan friars and Spanish soldiers in addition to the Apalachees until its abandonment in 1704 due to… Continue reading

Lake Jackson Mounds Archaeological State Park

The Lake Jackson Mounds State Park contains two earthen mounds available for public viewing. Once part of the Southeastern Ceremonial Complex which was the largest ceremonial center of the Fort Walton Native American… Continue reading

The Getty Villa, Part 2: The Collection

So as I mentioned in the previous post, I had to break my visit to the Getty Villa into two blog posts because I could not whittle my photos down. This post features… Continue reading

Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada

Because the government shutdown was ongoing, I decided to head to the California coast, where beaches and warmer temperatures could be enjoyed. Driving through Nevada however, I made a stop at Valley of… Continue reading

Anasazi Heritage Center and Stanton Englehart Exhibit

Before leaving Colorado I visited the Anasazi Heritage Center in Dolores. The small museum there is excellent, not just displaying artifacts but containing multiple interactive exhibits for both children and adults that really… Continue reading

Mesa Verde National Park, Part 2: Canyon Rim Dwellings and Spruce Tree House

There are over 600 archaeological sites within the park limits and though only a fraction of them are open to the public, I will not recount each of the dozen or so others… Continue reading

Mesa Verde National Park, Part 1: Cliff Palace and Balcony House

Mesa Verde is best known for its cliff dwellings. In fact, these dwellings are what people generally conjure up when discussing the Ancestral Puebloan culture (or the Anasazi as many people still refer… Continue reading